Archive for May, 2012


Here’s an excerpt from Cynthia Fuchs’ review on The Documentary Channel’s Memorial Day Marathon – Read full article here: http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/159112-documentaries-for-memorial-day/

“…Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek offers a series of interviews with re-enactors, dressed in Confederate and Union costumes, describing both the historical figures’ experiences and their own, how they endure physical hardships an imagine psychological ones. Sometimes these difficulties have to do with philosophy (“I have a few times portrayed a Confederate soldier,” notes one player, “And I just didn’t feel comfortable doing it”) and sometimes with some very basic logistics, as when Surgeon Major James Mills explains the rudimentary nature of medicine at the time, the lack of instruments, and yes, the prevalence of amputation: the film doesn’t linger on these disturbing aspects of reenactments, but Mills makes sure you’re aware of the pain endured.Image

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3rd  excerpt from my two-man play REMOTE CONTROL. Did you ever feel like your life was interrupting the television commercials?

Los Angeles 1980’s. Harold & Fred watch television: they become the characters they watch.

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TRANSITIONAL TV MONTAGE
The rear projection screen comes to life with images of video noise.  One image fades into the next to the tempo of the drumming and an intermittent buzz.  All sounds reach a climax as The Local Evening News theme music fades in and the screen provides a suitable background for the news. An ANCHOR (Fred) sits behind a desk.

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This is an excerpt from my two-man play REMOTE CONTROL. Did you ever feel like your life was interrupting the television commercials?

Los Angeles 1980’s. Harold & Fred watch television: they become the characters they watch.

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It’s a Beautiful World – Title Cut & Video – A collection of original songs written & performed by David George

Directed & Edited by David George

Available on iTunes, CD Baby, Amazon etc


As they did in the cold rain of April 1865, opposing armies in blue and gray stand shoulder to shoulder on the rolling farmland of Sayler’s Creek, Virginia. With a shout, guns are raised; a deafening crack; and smoke from the black powder hangs over the battlefield. Lisa Arden and I captured the action while filming our documentary:

The Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek – to be included in a Memorial Day Marathon May 28th 2012 2:30PM (ET)
DISH Network (Channel 197) and DIRECTV (Channel 267).

In 1969 I discovered a band in London. We called them “Someone’s Band” and recorded them for Deram a subsidiary of DECCA records. (I actually designed the album cover too!) To my surprise this is a highly coveted collectors album today! Selling on eBay for $1800.

I was just notified via Facebook by “Sir Cecil” lead vocalist and member of the Band that this record is about to be re-released!

Someone’s Band

Steve Stevenson and I were partners in a company we called Clouds Music Enterprises. We had an office on Dean St. in London in 1968-69. Steve was a sound mixer at the Shaftsbury Theater for the English company of Hair! Produced by Robert Stigwood. We also produced records for Paul Nicholas and Kookie Eaton who were in the cast of Hair at the time.  (Paul Nicholas went on to have a hit later with “Heaven on the 7th Floor”) (more…)


I recently attended Ted Cohen’s TAG Strategic conference at NARM.  There was the usual concern raised about music piracy.

In the UK, the BBC collects a license fee (£145.50 per year, per color TV set) to create programming that is free from commercial influence. This has worked well for many years.

ASCAP & BMI collect performance royalties in the US for the use of music and songs from radio and television and distribute the funds to writers and publishers based on how often the music is played.

Why can’t this model be used to collect fees from ISPs and then distribute the funds to the writers and publishers —  based on clicks or downloads? End of problem. No matter how many downloads, writers and publishers get paid for their work, insuring that they will produce more for their fans.

Let me know if you think this could be a solution.