Archive for the ‘Commentary’ Category


This photo featured in MrPorter April 2013

Architect: Brent Saville 1995

http://www.mrporter.com/journal/journal_issue109/4#3Image


My Voice Over

Leba

Posted: January 24, 2013 in Commentary
Tags: , ,

My Voice Over…


NickyOnSunsetNoText

 

 

 

 

©2013 David George
Nicky on Sunset


People who ought to be on billboards...

©2013 David George
Hoppe on Sunset Plaza


People who ought to be on billboards...

©2013 David George
Barbara on the Beverly Center


People who ought to be on billboards...

©2013 David George
Lisa & Sally Over Anawalt


My Voice Over on the Ad


If you accept that our social movements take two steps forward and one step back, then it looks like we’re on the threshold of another two steps forward lurch. (more…)


A compilation of recent Voice overs in the Narration Category. Take a listen. US English, UK English, East Indian accent.

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/47076404/DavidGeorge_Narration_Compilation%20.mp3


Get Your Bearings by Colleen Sattler, Narrated by David George

Here’s the latest Children’s audiobook I did the Voice Over for “Get Your Bearings” by Colleen Sattler available at the iTunes App Store. If you have kids it’s an inexpensive download for your iphone or ipad.

http://www.apps-life-love.com/


<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/49467127″>Compassion International – Water of Life 1: Situation</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/zionpictures”>Zion Pictures</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

1 of 2 Videos – I did the Voice Over for both.


This PSA will air on Netherlands TV Sept 1-7. I did the Voice over in one of my many accents. Great to be part of something so positive!


Look for “The Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek” – Next air date on The Documentary Channel Dec 20th at 3:00am (ET) Check local times or set DVR to record. Follow #BLSC on Twitter.

Here’s an excerpt from Cynthia Fuchs’ review on The Documentary Channel’s Memorial Day Marathon – Read full article here: http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/159112-documentaries-for-memorial-day/

“…Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek offers a series of interviews with re-enactors, dressed in Confederate and Union costumes, describing both the historical figures’ experiences and their own, how they endure physical hardships an imagine psychological ones. Sometimes these difficulties have to do with philosophy (“I have a few times portrayed a Confederate soldier,” notes one player, “And I just didn’t feel comfortable doing it”) and sometimes with some very basic logistics, as when Surgeon Major James Mills explains the rudimentary nature of medicine at the time, the lack of instruments, and yes, the prevalence of amputation: the film doesn’t linger on these disturbing aspects of reenactments, but Mills makes sure you’re aware of the pain endured.Image

The documentary does include some observations regarding the politics of the war, including both sides of the argument over what the South was fighting for (state’s rights or slavery), a young woman playing a woman who disguised herself as a man in order to fight (“As long as I keep my mouth shut, they cant tell”), a first-time black re-enactor’s self-description (“I think its gonna be fun because I get to ride horses, which is a thing I love to do”) and an admittedly subjective overview offered by Wendy Lee Oliver, the president of the Sayler’s Creek Reenactment and Preservation Committee. The event regularly brings tears to her eyes, she says: “I know how General Lee felt,” she adds, concerning what “we down here in the South call… the war of Northern Aggression.”

As Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek cuts from interviews to battle scenes, it suggests both the participants’ investments and how they might look from another perspective, not exactly skeptical, but not wholly devoted to the war as a cause, either, whether as a fixed history or as a political identity marker…”

Cynthia Fuchs is director of Film & Media Studies and Associate Professor of English, Film & Video Studies, African and African American Studies, Sport & American Culture, at George Mason University.


@DOC_Channel: NEXT 6/22 1:30PM (ET) – Battle of Little Saylers Creek youtube.com/watch?v=EKfJsU… #BLSC Set DVR

The Round Table

Here’s an excerpt from Cynthia Fuchs’ review on The Documentary Channel’s Memorial Day Marathon – Read full article here: http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/159112-documentaries-for-memorial-day/

“…Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek offers a series of interviews with re-enactors, dressed in Confederate and Union costumes, describing both the historical figures’ experiences and their own, how they endure physical hardships an imagine psychological ones. Sometimes these difficulties have to do with philosophy (“I have a few times portrayed a Confederate soldier,” notes one player, “And I just didn’t feel comfortable doing it”) and sometimes with some very basic logistics, as when Surgeon Major James Mills explains the rudimentary nature of medicine at the time, the lack of instruments, and yes, the prevalence of amputation: the film doesn’t linger on these disturbing aspects of reenactments, but Mills makes sure you’re aware of the pain endured.Image

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3rd  excerpt from my two-man play REMOTE CONTROL. Did you ever feel like your life was interrupting the television commercials?

Los Angeles 1980’s. Harold & Fred watch television: they become the characters they watch.

Image

HAROLD & FRED’S APARTMENT – DAY
Harold is in his bathrobe and Fred is in his frock on the couch playing solitaire.
HAROLD: It was her muddledheadedness that was the problem.
FRED: Couldn’t follow a line of logic?
HAROLD: That’s it exactly.  We’d go and see a film, for instance, a war film that was about the horrors of war.  The film clearly champions peace and tries to show that war is stupid…
FRED: …And does it by showing the atrocity.
HAROLD: Well, of course.  She would get so stuck on the idea that the film was glorifying violence by showing it at all, that she’d instantly dismiss this film that essentially agreed with her point of view.  Well, you want to have a conversation with someone like that about what the film was all about but you can’t, can you?  You get stuck in the debris of irrelevance.
FRED:Right.  So what happened?

(more…)


Here’s an excerpt from Cynthia Fuchs’ review on The Documentary Channel’s Memorial Day Marathon – Read full article here: http://www.popmatters.com/pm/review/159112-documentaries-for-memorial-day/

“…Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek offers a series of interviews with re-enactors, dressed in Confederate and Union costumes, describing both the historical figures’ experiences and their own, how they endure physical hardships an imagine psychological ones. Sometimes these difficulties have to do with philosophy (“I have a few times portrayed a Confederate soldier,” notes one player, “And I just didn’t feel comfortable doing it”) and sometimes with some very basic logistics, as when Surgeon Major James Mills explains the rudimentary nature of medicine at the time, the lack of instruments, and yes, the prevalence of amputation: the film doesn’t linger on these disturbing aspects of reenactments, but Mills makes sure you’re aware of the pain endured.Image

(more…)


3rd  excerpt from my two-man play REMOTE CONTROL. Did you ever feel like your life was interrupting the television commercials?

Los Angeles 1980’s. Harold & Fred watch television: they become the characters they watch.

Image

TRANSITIONAL TV MONTAGE
The rear projection screen comes to life with images of video noise.  One image fades into the next to the tempo of the drumming and an intermittent buzz.  All sounds reach a climax as The Local Evening News theme music fades in and the screen provides a suitable background for the news. An ANCHOR (Fred) sits behind a desk.

(more…)


This is an excerpt from my two-man play REMOTE CONTROL. Did you ever feel like your life was interrupting the television commercials?

Los Angeles 1980’s. Harold & Fred watch television: they become the characters they watch.

Image

(more…)


As they did in the cold rain of April 1865, opposing armies in blue and gray stand shoulder to shoulder on the rolling farmland of Sayler’s Creek, Virginia. With a shout, guns are raised; a deafening crack; and smoke from the black powder hangs over the battlefield. Lisa Arden and I captured the action while filming our documentary:

The Battle of Little Sayler’s Creek – to be included in a Memorial Day Marathon May 28th 2012 2:30PM (ET)
DISH Network (Channel 197) and DIRECTV (Channel 267).